Pennsylvania Center for the Book

PUBLIC POETRY PROJECT

A celebration of poems to the people

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2000-2001 Poetry Posters
Santo Domingo Feast Day Poster

Santo Domingo Feast Day
By Robin Becker

Robin Becker’s “Santo Domingo Feast Day” is poetry as incantation, chanting the reader to an experience both highly particular and viscerally familiar.

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Ants poster

Ants
By Gary Fincke

Gary Fincke’s poem “Ants” tells a truth about being a young man: You don’t want to look stupid, but on the other hand, you think you’re being attacked by ants. You are prey to the seductive horrors of science fiction and family lore, while trying to figure out the world around you.

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Tornadoes Up Your Windpipe poster

Tornadoes Up Your Windpipe
By Marjorie Maddox

The level of observation in Marjorie Maddox’s “Tornadoes Up Your Windpipe” is striking in its originality. The fascination with another is the topic of many love poems, and with playfulness and oddity it works here as well.

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Courage poster

Landscape with Desire
By Julia Kasdorf

Julia Kasdorf’s “Landscape with Desire” has deep associations with the landscape and our emotional responses and ties to it and within it. The poem reminds us of the project’s ties to place.

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If a Simple Meditation Works, Trust It poster

If a Simple Meditation Works, Trust It
By John Haag

John Haag’s “If a Simple Meditation Works, Trust It” elicits admiration for the way the tumult of images at the beginning resolves itself in wonder, and in an appealing notion about poetry—that the moments with which poets are often concerned are “worth more than ordinary attention.”

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Showing a Friend My Town poster

Showing a Friend My Town
By Harry Humes

Kim Fisher, the first person behind the idea of the Public Poetry Project, liked that the speaker in “Showing a Friend My Town” walked around pointing things out while telling a story the items collectively implied. The empty chair at the end holds the most, implying all the loss that the bounty of the poem seems determined to mask.

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